France Ideas To Write A Essay

To write a really good 5 paragraph essay example one must possess good writing skills. Teachers and professors provide students with opportunities to improve their skills by assigning them to write various types of essays. This type of practice is extremely helpful for students wanting to get excellent grades for their written tests. No matter whether you are writing a French Revolution essay, a Civil War essay, or a heroism essay you should follow step-by-step instructions for planning, researching, outlining, and writing the final draft of your 5 paragraph essay.

5 Paragraph Essay Writing Steps

Step 1. The planning.

When it comes to writing a 5 paragraph French Revolution essay, the most important step is planning. A correctly planned essay can almost write itself. The main aim of each lecturer is to teach his or her students to plan their writing and to organize their thoughts. When writing a heroism essay about the French Revolution you should carefully read the assignment and understand its essence. To impress the tutor students should write about the less familiar topics of the Revolution. Pick a topic that is neither too broad, nor too narrow. Just focus on a particular issue and think it over carefully. The golden rule is to follow a 5 paragraph essay example as a guide.

Step 2. An outline.

After you have researched and understood the topic of your French Revolution essay, then you are ready to move to the next step. This involves using your 5 paragraph essay example, as you will need to create an outline and this will help you. It is the most important part of writing your heroism essay. It will enable you to write the paper’s topic, fix your position on the subject, and present several reasons supported by evidence. At this stage your academic paper is almost ready to be written.

Step 3. 5 paragraph essay.

At last you have arrived at the easiest step of writing your French Revolution essay –just arrange the available materials and ideas into a 5 paragraph paper format and add your transitions to make it flow coherently. Your heroism essay is almost ready.
The 5 paragraphs are:

  1. Introduction: The main aim of this part is to state the assigned paper topic, and give your position on the French Revolution and your reasons.
  2. Paragraph 1: The first paragraph of your heroism essay should explain the reason why you support your stated position. It ends with transitional sentence.
  3. Paragraph 2: Here you talk about your second reason – the procedure is the same.
  4. Paragraph 3: As you’ve already guessed, you repeat the same procedure giving your third reason.
  5. Conclusion: At this stage of writing your French Revolution essay you restate your point of view and write a final sentence. Finish your heroism essay by expressing your hope for the future.

French Revolution Essay Topics

  • The Terror and Tyranny of the Radical Revolution in France.
  • What Were the Consequences of Louis XVI Weaknesses in So far as They Influenced the French Revolution?
  • The French Revolution and Its Social Classes.
  • Literature and the French Revolution.
  • Historical Outline of French Revolution.
  • The Principles of French Revolution.
  • Time Line of French Revolution.
  • Government Theories of Post-French Revolution.

French Revolution Essay Sample

What is the best known event of the French Revolution and why it is so well-known?

The best-known event of the French Revolution was Storming of the Bastille, which happened on 14th July of 1789. Every citizen of France knows this date because of the bitterly major scales of the conflict which had led France to be the country it is now with its laws and political state. The storming of the Bastille shows the effect revolution can have in the country; the power people have over their governments and the price it takes to inflict such significant changes.

The storming of the Bastille did not happen without reasons; there was a context behind it that led to the bloody escalation of the conflict. The situation in France began to destabilize after its intervention to the American Revolution, which could not pass without negative economic consequences for France, as well as inevitable casualties among the recruited French citizens. Then, King Louis XVI has made a lot of mistakes when dealing with the proposed ways of bringing back the economic stability due to his archaic ways of handling the position of the ruler of the country (Prendergast, Christopher). The final step was made when King decided to dismiss the National Constituent Assembly and dismissed the finance minister, Jacques Necker, proceeding with the total reformation of the ministry with nobility holding power.

Of course, citizens who sympathized Necker were very dissatisfied and viewed his dismissal as an act of tyranny. The fact that the attention and the sympathy of the crowd were focused on one person has brought the coming of the great revolt which later transformed to a full-scale revolution. One of the events that have put an end to King’s attempts to hold power over the situation was Storming of the Bastille, which was not originally planned by the rebels (Prendergast, Christopher). The reason for intervening into the fortress was to find weapons for the accelerating revolution but has turned into a battle because of the stressed crowd. The commander of the Bastille’s garrison was ready to surrender when two of the rebels have opened the gate, and the crowd has started to move inside the fortress. The whole massacre could have been avoided if the crowd has correctly heard screams of surrender and not misinterpreted it for screams of mocking.

The consequences of the Storming were scary: commander of the garrison, Marquise De Launay and Monsieur Flesselles, Prévôt des Marchands were lynched by the crowd after 1000 of rebels were killed during the unwanted siege (Harris, Nathaniel). This event has made the King realize the scale of the situation and act according to people’s will. The fact that the Storming had such trivial reasons and happened due to the huge emotional stress of the crowd has persuaded the government of that time and the governments that proceeded to control the country take people’s concerns into account. The symbol of the royal power was destroyed, which gave people a visual sign that they have won, which has raised their morale. Generations have seen Bastille towering over the surrounding houses just as the King was towering over the ordinary people with no more than his shadow put on ordinary people. Surely, this event could not get forgotten due to its scales and effect that has shifted the political paradigm of the country. The ministry has been reformed again, this time with a huge portion of people’s candidates instead of the purely noble ones who could not correctly represent the interests of the population (Harris, Nathaniel). The national flag of France was also changed, now consisting of blue and red colors of Paris (and rebels), and the white color which symbolized the King’s part. This chain of events has left much of visual signs of liberation and the successful revolution. In fact, even now revolutions are often associated with France as an example of a positive change inflicted by citizens themselves.

As it could be seen, the results of the Storming of the Bastille makes it the best-known event of the French Revolution of the XVIII century. The fact that the day of the event is now a public holiday highlights the importance of the Storming for the country. It was not the strategic importance of the Bastille as a military object, but the symbolic representation of the King’s tyranny and undisputable power which was brought down by unsatisfied people of France. This way, Storming of the Bastille holds a place of the demonstration of people’s power and a reminder for governments that they must serve their people rather than ignore them. Until these days, the memorial of the event is located on the place where Bastille once stood, acting as a reminder and the proof that this is the most known event of the French Revolution. However, it also acts as a reminder of the wild nature of crowds who can wreak havoc without realizing who are they harming and the consequences of their actions. Victory has not come without unnecessary casualties, which is also a thing the history bitterly remembers.

Works Cited

Harris, Nathaniel. The Fall Of The Bastille. 1st ed., London, Dryad Press, 1986.
Prendergast, Christopher. The Fourteenth Of July. 1st ed., London, Profile Books, 2008.

French Revolution Essay Help

You might want to order your 5 paragraph essay example on the French Revolution from EssayShark.com. We will also write an original paper for you. We guarantee you will receive a high quality paper at an affordable price. Our professional writers will choose a topic and write a paper according to your specified requirements. The content will be sound and the formatting according to the accepted academic standards such as MLA, APA, Harvard, or Chicago /Turiban. You will be able to “chat” directly with your assigned writer, and have free revisions, until you are happy with the result. If you are faced with writing your heroism essay and are worried about your grades simply place your order on our site and wait for the delivery of your paper.

Topic suggestion toolFind some good topics Posted in Essay Writing
Order Now
Submit your instructions to writers for free

Essay Writing in French

Essay Writing in French

In citing electronic resources, you should in the first instance follow the same general rules as for printed sources, as the following example of a reference to an item contained on the (vast) Gallica site of the Bibliothèque nationale de France indicates:

  • the name of the author and of the text cited should be given in full, e.g. Louis de Bonald, Économie politique, p. x.
  • next, you should cite the name of the webpage or web service that provides the source, e.g. Website: BNF Gallica
  • next, you should cite the URL of the source itself
  • finally, you should give the date on which you last accessed this URL

A complete reference would thus look something like this:

Louis de Bonald, Économie politique (Paris, J.-P. Migne, 1859), p. x. Website: BNF Gallica.
URL: http://gallica.bnf.fr/scripts/ConsultationTout.exe?O=N023496&T=0. Last consulted: 12 December 2001.

Your bibliography should also record this information, together with the full publication details of any published work cited. Here is a further example:

Website: Calendrier des spectacles sous l'Ancien Régime (Barry Russell, Oxford Brookes University). URL: http://foires.net/cal/cal.shtml. Last consulted: 12 December 2001.

For further information, consult the following sources.

Bibliography

Your bibliography should figure at the end of your essay, and should give information concerning authors, titles and publication details for all primary and secondary works used:

Primary sources

Baudelaire, Charles, Les Fleurs du mal, ed. by C. Pichois (Paris, Gallimard, 1996)

   ------, Le Spleen de Paris, ed. by D. Scott and B. Wright (Paris, Garnier-Flammarion, 1987)

Secondary sources

Auerbach, Erich, Mimesis: The Representation of Reality in Western Literature, tr. by W. Trask (Princeton, Princeton University Press, 1953)

Bersani, Leo, Baudelaire and Freud (Berkeley, University of California Press, 1977)

Laforgue, Pierre, 'Baudelaire, Hugo et la royauté du poète: le romantisme en 1860', Revue d'histoire littéraire de la France, 96 (1996), 966--82

Pichois, Claude, Baudelaire, tr. by Graham Robb (London, Hamish Hamilton, 1989)

Thélot, Jérôme, Baudelaire: violence et poésie (Paris, Gallimard, 1993)

The following points should be noted:

  • in the case of any item published as a book, the place of publication, publisher and date should be given;
  • where a text is cited, the name of the editor should be given, as in the examples of texts by Baudelaire above;
  • the titles of books or of journals are generally printed in italics (or simply underlined, if your essay is written by hand);
  • where an article is cited, its title should be given in single quotation marks, and the volume number, year of publication and precise page references should all be given.

Contents

Submission

Work must be submitted on the stated deadline. Under certain circumstances (e.g. certified illness) an extension may be granted by the lecturer concerned. Your essay should have a cover-sheet:

Name: A. N. Other

Student number: 99999999

Language and Cultural Studies French II

FR2202: Literary seminar I

Lecturer: Dr Untel

Date of submission: 30 January 2002

Note the following points:

  • you should write your name, your degree programme and year and your student number clearly on your essay;
  • you should also write the name and the course code of the module of which the essay forms part (e.g. FR2501: French thought and the history of ideas I: Political thought);
  • you are required to submit two copies of each essay (one of which may be a photocopy); one copy of the essay will be returned to you.

Contents

Contents

One of the key features of the study of French is writing: in each year of the programme, you have the opportunity to work on seminar presentations and essays, developing an account of a specific theme or topic --- and you can thus develop skills in argument and in the effective organization and communication of your ideas.

Contents


Argument

An essay is based on your own thinking and writing, and involves close discussion of the texts and other materials on which you have been working. All essays are written with a specific question or topic in mind and relevance to the topic is a primary requirement of a successful essay. If the topic requires you to write, say, about the dramatic impact of Racine's Athalie, don't deal at length with the theme of courtly corruption; if the essay titles specifies, say, that you should write about word-order as a feature of French syntax, you will probably stray from the topic if you start to write at length about regional variations in the use of French.

An essay also provides a reasoned justification of your point of view. Try to present your ideas in an orderly way. You should use relevant examples to justify the points you make. In reaching your conclusion, you should seek to take into account objections to your own argument. You should also think carefully about alternative conclusions: does your conclusion present the most likely explanation?

Be precise in your use of texts to justify your point of view. Make sure that any claims you make about the text are true. If you use quotations, make sure that they help your argument. Avoid retelling the story. An essay is a piece of independent work. It will involve the discovery and use of relevant information. In your essays, you may need to use a wide range of sources, including the texts on which you have been working, other relevant texts, and critical works. As well as quoting from these works, you may need to cite them (in other words, make a brief reference without quoting).

Persuasive writing demands clear and concise expression. Be clear, precise and consistent in your use of the key terms in your argument (e.g. irony, classical, diegetic, popular, metalanguage, determiner).

Contents

Sources — and plagiarism

The sources of all quotations and citations should be clearly noted in your essay. Your essay should also include a bibliography, or an alphabetical list of all texts and sources cited. Your essay will be assessed in part according to the relevance and the cogency of your use of your sources. It is therefore most important that you acknowledge all your sources. Systematic failure to do so may lead to plagiarism, or unacknowledged use of the words or ideas of others. Patent plagiarism will justify a fail mark (in extreme cases, a mark of zero).

In the course of your research and your writing, therefore, you need to think carefully about your use of sources. Finding relevant information to support your analysis and argument is one of the key skills which you will acquire in your work --- for further guidance, see the page devoted to French subject and information resources. When reading texts or critical works, you should take care to include in your notes page references for ideas to which you wish to refer, or for passages which you transcribe for later use. When you use an idea or where you quote from another source, you must acknowledge this use by giving the title of the work in question and a precise page reference, which may refer, as in the example below, to a page-range:

Thélot's discussion of the poem, on the other hand, stresses its paradoxical qualities (see Baudelaire: violence et poésie, pp. 378--81), a view that enables us to give a more persuasive account of its opening.

It is not always necessary to quote from a critical source, but in all cases where you make use of another person's ideas, you must acknowledge that you have done so. If you make use of points made in lectures, you should say so by including a reference in a footnote. You must make sure also to provide references for factual statements:

Baudelaire was convicted of offence to public morality and was fined 300 francs (see Pichois, Baudelaire, p. 232).

Contents

Style

An essay is a carefully structured piece of writing. Aim to communicate clearly and make sure to use paragraph breaks to enable your reader to follow the flow of your ideas. In your written work, you should strive to be legible. If you use a word processor, it may be helpful to write a first draft of your essay by hand.

Brief quotations from texts or other works should be introduced by a colon and enclosed within quotation marks, as follows: '— Hypocrite lecteur, — mon semblable, — mon frère!'. You should take care to ensure that your quotations (including accentuation and punctuation) are accurate. Longer quotations (i.e. longer than about forty words) may be set off (see how to set quotations off when using a word-processor). In this case, no quotation marks are needed:

Sois sage, ô ma Douleur, et tiens-toi plus tranquille.
Tu réclamais le Soir; il descend; le voici:
Une atmosphère obscure enveloppe la ville,
Aux uns portant la paix, aux autres le souci.

Baudelaire, 'Recueillement', Les Fleurs du mal, ll.1--4

The source of all quotations should be included in your essay, preferably in notes at the foot of the page or the end of the essay (see advice online on how to insert footnotes when using a word-processor). You must take sure to be precise in transcribing quotations from texts (and take special care to include accents in quotations from French --- follow the advice on inserting accents when using a word-processor).

You should take care to present the titles of your sources — full-length works, poems, essays, articles — in as clear a way as possible. You will see in critical works that the title of a work is italicized, so as to distinguish, say, between a character in a text and the text itself: 'Athalie is undoubtedly the most awesome figure in Athalie'. If you write your essay by hand, you should underline the titles of full-length works: Madame Bovary, Phèdre, Les Fleurs du mal, L'Amant. This convention should be used also with critical works and with journals: Mimesis, Modern French Drama, Figures, French Studies. References to any work quoted or cited should include a page reference:

Auerbach argues that styles of representation can point to the fragmentation of reality into reflections of various individual consciousnesses (Mimesis, p. 551).

The titles of shorter works, or parts of a work, or of articles, are given in quotation marks, as in the example from Baudelaire above, or as follows:

'Le voyage' is the closing poem in Les Fleurs du mal.

Contents

Citing electronic sources

Useful sources are increasingly available online --- see again the guidance on French subject and information resources. Your use of such sources must be documented, just as your use of books and articles, say, must be.

Now, the citation of materials maintained online presents certain problems, in part because Uniform Resource Locators (or URLs, or typical web 'addresses' in the form http://www.ucc.ie/french/) give information precisely on locations, and not as a rule on what a file may contain, or its title. In general, therefore, you should give the title of the website (as indicated on its home or main page) as well as the name of the page which you are citing, together with the URL. Because URLs are not absolutely persistent (a file may disappear, or the page cited may move to a different location, even without changing its content), you should also give the date on which you last referred to the file or page. In general, the title of a page is what appears in the title bar of your browser:

0 thoughts on “France Ideas To Write A Essay”

    -->

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *