Patrick Smith Essays On Education

Patrick Brian Smith

Part-time Professor, Cinema

Patrick Brian Smith is a Film and Moving Image Studies PhD Candidate in the Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema at Concordia University, Montreal. His research interests include experimental nonfiction cinema, the politics of space, Marxist geography, late-capitalism's (un)representability, and the essay film. He is currently working on a thesis project entitled "The Politics of Spatiality in Experimental Non-Fiction Cinema," which maps out the presence of a spatio-political tendency within a diverse corpus of contemporary experimental nonfiction films. Fundamentally, within an epoch structured around the machinations of transnational global capital, authoritarian state (and supra-state) governance, the birth of an obfuscated neo-colonialism and neoliberalist political hegemony, how can contemporary moving image practices capture—and, concomitantly, offer modes of resistance to—the spatial machinations of contemporary power relations?

FFAR 250 - Keywords: Reading the Arts Across the Disciplines

Tutorial leader with Dr. MJ Thompson, Dr. Anja Bock, and Dr. Tammer El-Sheikh

Fall 2015 - Winter 2018

FMST 211 - Film History to 1959

Part-time Instructor
Winter 2018

2017
Smith, Patrick Brian and Patrick Brodie. "Documenting Capital: Intersections of Free Trade Zone Architecture and Digital Filmmaking." Pause Button 4 (2017), http://pausebutton.org/pb4-doccapital.

2016
Smith, Patrick Brian. "The Politics of Spatiality in Experimental Nonfiction Cinema: Jonathan Perel's ‘Toponimia.’" NECSUS European Journal of Media Studies 10 (2016), http://www.necsus-ejms.org/politics-spatiality-experimental-nonfiction-cinema-jonathan-perels-toponimia.

2015

Smith, Patrick Brian. "Working/Slow: Cinematic Style as Labour in Wang Bing’s Tie Xi Qu: West of the Tracks." In Traditions in World Cinema: Slow Cinema, edited by Tiago de Luca and Nuno Jorge, 180-191. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2015. 

Abstract

Essay 1: Institutional Investment, Asset Illiquidity, and Post-Crash Housing Market Dynamics

Abstract: I demonstrate that housing’s mildly segmented market structure adds an additional measure of asset illiquidity risk for owner-occupiers and their lenders by examining the effect of a house’s conversion from the owner-occupied market to the rental market. From 2012 to 2014, I find that owner-occupied houses that were purchased by institutional investors and converted to rentals after the real estate crisis sold for approximately 5% less than similar houses that sold to owner-occupiers. The large discount was in addition to REO, foreclosure, short sale, and cash purchase discounts which, when combined, highlight the low liquidation value for owner-occupied housing.

Essay 2: Homeownership: An examination of its effect on house prices

Abstract: Subsidizing homeownership is only justifiable if it increases homeownership attainment and creates external benefits that outweigh their costs. Using parcel-level panel data I isolate and examine the effect of homeownership on surrounding house prices. Homeownership has a causal effect on house prices, but substantial variation exists across quantiles. Changes in homeownership have a lesser (greater) effect on house prices in the upper (lower) deciles of the conditional house price distribution - despite the fact that households in the upper deciles are the primary beneficiaries of the federal tax subsidies for homeownership.

Essay 3: School Quality, Latent Demand, and Bidding Wars for Houses

Abstract: I examine the recent rise of bidding wars and their effectiveness relative to traditional listing strategies. A simple theoretical model predicts that underpricing a house to incite a bidding war will be most effective in housing markets with high levels of latent demand. I use school quality as a proxy for latent demand as households with children naturally want their kids to go to the best school possible. I posit that the limited supply of housing within high quality school districts creates latent demand for housing within those districts. Evidence from Atlanta supports the model - I find that underpricing a house to incite a bidding war is more effective in markets with latent demand. However, underpricing does not outperform traditional listing strategies.

Recommended Citation

Smith, Patrick S., "Three Essays on the Housing Market." Dissertation, Georgia State University, 2016.
https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/real_estate_diss/18

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